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New and improved MedRP guide

O'Connor

God Tier
Retired Staff
ULTRA MEGA USER
Medical Guide


KEEP IN MIND THIS IS JUST A GUIDE, THIS IS NOT LAW, YOUR MEDRP IS YOUR OWN AND AS LONG AS IT'S NOT FAILRP IT’S FINE.


Before you treat someone, make sure they are not under fire and that they are in cover. You are not to perform surgeries when there are hostiles near his or her location unless ordered by a higher up.


When in the field you may only heal someone back up to full if they never dropped below wounded. If they dropped below wounded to near death or badly wounded, you may only stabilize them back to wounded and attempt to get them back to a medbay.



General knowledge



If you brought multiple people into the medbay at once, you need to diagnose each patient and see what is wrong with each person. You then administer treatment, beginning with the person in most critical condition (most injured), and ending with the most stable person (least injured).


Receiving a call



Usually, personnel will get injured and need medical attention immediately. If you receive a call on radio, respond to the higher personnel first (I.e, A level 4 needs medical attention immediately). Once given a location radio in to tell them you are enroute, and make your way over there as quickly as possible. Once you are there you are to make the decision whether they need to go to a medbay to be treated, and begin treatment as quickly as possible.



On the field




If the personnel is under fire and you cannot get to cover then you are to tell them to cease fire and get out of the line of fire. You are to give them ketamine ONCE, applies a gauze pad and apply a tourniquet to the limb. Once you can transport them to cover and he is safe, perform surgery immediately.



In a medbay



You have full access to whatever you would normally need in here. This is where you are supposed to fully deal with a patient, do not be afraid to call for other medical personnel if you begin to get swamped. (FMO’S, MRU’S, Captains, Chief).



D-Block


Occasionally Z-Units will have to call for medical assistance for D-Class. Before you receive the D-Class make sure he is restrained and accompanied by someone else. Treat their wound as fast as possible and once treated, administer Class A Amnestics to them. MAKE SURE HE IS NOT BRINGING IN ANY MEDICAL SUPPLIES (I.e pills or syringes).


When to terminate a D-Class


If a D-class has an irreparable or chronic condition, and/or is missing any more than 3 fingers, or 3 toes on any one hand/foot (including missing an arm/leg), or would be otherwise unable to complete their duties as a D-Class personnel, they are to be terminated. They are also to be terminated if the treatment of a condition they have would result in their becoming unable to perform their duties.

YOU ARE NOT TO TERMINATE SICK D-CLASS IF YOU ARE ABLE TO TREAT THEM WITH STANDARD MEDICATIONS.

Priorities

When healing people, it is important to know who you have to heal first. Out of a raiding scenario, you should have two things in mind, how hurt the person is and if their rank. A hurt Commander takes priority over a wounded grunt, but a near death grunt takes priority over a hurt Commander unless specifically ordered by a Gamma. If there are multiple people with the same injuries then refer to their rank.


Raid priorities


Weather you are raiding or being raided, wounds are likely to occur, be ready. Make sure you stay with your group and listen to your superior officers, and always follow the treatment priority list (from most important to least):

1. Explosives Specialist


2. Gamma Personnel (Colonels & Commanders)


3. Field Medic


4. Heavy


5. Marksman


6. Operative


7. Grunt

In a foreign medbay


The foundation has several medbays, many of which you will be able to use. You may recognize some of the technology, or you may not. Generally speaking, unless you’re sure what something is/does, don’t touch it, and ask your superior officers about it if you think it may be of use. Foundation medbays in the Provost HQ, SID HQ, and LCZ, all may be of use, and allow you to treat more difficult wounds, just make sure you have at least one person watching your back so you and your patient are not taken by surprise.


Back home


Back home you will have access to all of the tools you’re used to, don’t be afraid to ask other medics, or even your Medical Major for help if you get swamped with patients.


Medical Treatments



Medical Roll Bonus for FMOs and MRUs: +30



There are 3 kinds of medical actions.​


Easy actions (highlighted in green later): These are low risk to the patient, and serve little to no threat if you mess them up. (Ex: wrapping a wound in gauze, or cleaning out a wound) YOU DO NOT ROLL FOR THESE


Testing actions (highlighted in orange later): These are actions to determine the extent of damage to a person. Note: whenever possible supplement these with LogicRP; If someone gets shot with an M82 you don’t need to roll to check if there’s an exit wound, it went right through. (Ex: Checking for internal bleeding with a stethoscope, or checking to see if someone’s leg is broken) YOU NEED TO ROLL FOR THESE BUT YOU DO NOT INCLUDE YOUR ROLL BONUS


Hard actions (highlighted in red later): These are potentially dangerous actions that, if you fail, can hurt your patient. Most of these you have to get above a 50, but, because of your roll bonus, you effectively have to roll at least a 20 to succeed. However, if you fail you must do a /it to describe what went wrong, and do another /me to fix it. (Ex: Making an incision, or cauterizing blood vessels with a bovie pen) YOU NEED TO ROLL FOR THESE AND YOU INCLUDE YOUR ROLL BONUS


Stabilization


Stabilization is the process in which we stop blood from leaving the body with the following tools at your disposal:


Rags: These are the makeshift gauze pads that are used as a last resort when there aren't any gauze pads disposable to you.

Gauze Pads: Gauze pads are used to stop blood flow until the gauze pads cannot hold anymore blood and eventually start to leak. Always add more gauze on top, and do not take gauze off unless you are performing surgery. (OOC: You need to be FMO+/Medic+ to use gauze pads or if you have an authorization a gauze pad, tourniquet, and surgical kit. )

Tourniquet: A tourniquet is used to stop blood from going to the targeted limb which prevents the blood from flowing out of the body. DO NOT leave it for a long period, it will deprive the limb of oxygen and may lead to the need for amputation. (THIS IS ONLY TO BE USED FOR A WOUND TO THE LEG OR ARM, DO NOT USE A TOURNIQUET ON SOMEONE’S TORSO OR HEAD)


Surgical Kit: The surgical kit is used to stop all blood flow from the body permanently. (OOC: This is what you use once you have completed all of your treatment /me’s)

In a perfect world you would get injured people to a medbay as quickly as possible, but in dire circumstances sometimes people need to stay on their feet, that’s where field stabilization comes in.

The general flow for field stabilization:
1) Clean the wound thoroughly with gauze and isopropyl alcohol

2) administer an anesthetic (10-15 ml is the recommended field dose of ketamine to not lose reaction time, or, if available fentanyl also works)

3) You can do any number of things from here: Wrap the wound tightly in bandages to try to stop the bleeding, put some rough stitches into the wound and mark any remaining bullets for later, or try to cauterize as much of the bleeding wound as possible. Each of these have their own bonuses and disadvantages so it depends on the situation.

Before the Surgery you should wash your hands and wear sterilized gloves


Before you treat them make sure you ask them the following questions as fast as possible:

What happened?

(Ask further questions based on the nature of the injury)

Where were you shot?

With what gun/what caliber of bullet?

When did it happen?

Have you had ketamine in the last hour?


Ketamine:


Ketamine is a very strong anesthesia and anesthetic that is commonly used to remove bullets or any other surgery. Using Ketamine can sometimes cause hallucinations, vomiting, disorientation, or limited awareness, which is why you have to get the proper dosage when treating someone. Giving someone Ketamine DOES NOT REQUIRE A /ME! Ketamine can be found in some of the cupboards in the Infirmaries and is called "White Filled Vial", syringes can also be found near it. Keep in mind syringes can only hold 30mls of Ketamine.


1) Take out the "White Filled Vial" and syringe and have them in your inventory.

2) Right click on the syringe and and press "Extract from Item" and click on the Vial, then enter the number you need and it should be filled.

3) To use it on yourself or someone else right click on the syringe and press either "Inject into Self" or "Inject into Target" and type in the ml of Ketamine.

Dosage:


Before you move onto dosages, you have to understand that Ketamine is injected intramuscularly (I.M.) through 4 major points: The deltoid muscle, the thigh, the top right of your buttocks, and the right of your hip. You inject Ketamine into one of these muscles that is closest to the wound. Furthermore, if you are performing surgery make sure you ask them if they have taken Ketamine already.

>=10ml = Light analgesia

Effects: The patient will feel slight pain relief.


>=15ml = Common Dosage

Effects: The patient will be relieved of pain, standard dosage.


>= 30ml = Weakness, strong analgesia

Effects: The patient will feel weaker, and the pain will be numbed. Standard for surgeries


>=45ml = Anesthesia

Effects: The patient will fall sleep.


>=60ml = Overdose

DANGEROUS, DO NOT USE ON PATIENTS

Effects: Will cause an overdose to the patient.

Note: If you are unsure of how much ketamine a patient had recently, and because the overdose and anesthesia dose are 15Mls apart, if you only ever give a conscious patient less than 15Mls you can’t OD them.


If they’re healthy, it’s pretty much just a scratch.


  1. Clean the wound with gauze and isopropyl alcohol

  2. Wrap the wound in gauze and tape it down with medical tape

If they’re hurt it’s probably more like a gash, the bullet grazed them but didn’t go right in.


  1. Clean the wound with gauze and Isopropyl alcohol.

  2. Administer 30 ml of ketamine (DO NOT GIVE THEM ANOTHER DOSE IF YOU HAVE ALREADY GIVEN THEM KETAMINE).

  3. Suture the wound closed and/or cauterize the blood vessels with a bovie pen depending on the nature of the wound.
  4. Wrap it in gauze and tape the gauze down with medical tape.

Check for internal bleeding with a stethoscope [75+ and there is]

SUPPLEMENT WITH LOGICRP WHEN POSSIBLE. (If you stop the bleeding but their blood pressure keeps dropping they probably have at least internal bleeding)

Check for arterial bleeding [If you roll 70+ it is]

SUPPLEMENT WITH LOGICRP WHEN POSSIBLE.

Use a stethoscope to listen for the telltale sucking sound of a punctured lung [If you roll 80+ the lung is punctured]

SUPPLEMENT WITH LOGICRP WHEN POSSIBLE. (If they’re wheezing they probably have a punctured lung)

1. If the patient is shot on an area that would likely cause a lot of bleeding (i.e, abdomen, chest, etc.), connect them to an IV with O-Blood. Otherwise, skip to step 2.


2. Clean the area with a gauze pad and Isopropyl Alcohol and use medical tape to wrap it around the wound.


3. (Only if its a limb wound) Apply a tourniquet, with several inches of space, above the wound and tie it tightly.


4. Inject 45ml of Ketamine into the muscle that's closest to the wound: The thigh,the deltoid muscle (below the neck and near the arm), the hip, and the buttocks (top right).


5. Check for an exit wound [Anything above +50 and it is]

SUPPLEMENT WITH LOGICRP WHEN POSSIBLE (If they were shot by a high caliber gun, ex: sniper rifle, there’s almost definitely an exit wound. If they were shot by a low caliber gun, ex: a pistol, there’s almost definitely no exit wound, if it even pierced the kevlar at all.


6. (if no exit wound) Make an incision with a scalpel to open the wound, hold it down with clamps, and attempt to remove the bullet .


7. Clean out the wound with a gauze pad.


8. Suture up the wound, if there was an exit wound suture up both sides.


9. Wrap the wound in gauze (to prevent infection) and tape it down with medical tape.


10. When you finish, take them off the IV and patch up the hole with a bandaid

1)Place them with an IV of O- Blood if they aren't connected to one already

2) Give them 45ml of Ketamine to the nearest muscle point (DO NOT DO GIVE THEM A SECOND DOSE IF YOU ALREADY HAVE).

3) Make an incision near the area of internal bleeding and hold it down with clamps.

4) Drain the blood inside of the incision.

5) Use a bovie pen to cauterize the blood vessels.

6) Clean the wound inside and out.

7) Suture the incision.

1) Use a gauze pad to try and stop the bleeding, if not done already put them on an IV of O- Blood. Apply pressure by pressing down just proximal to the wound (the side of that’s closer to the heart) to try and stop it as well


2) Give them 45ml of Ketamine to the nearest muscle point (DO NOT DO GIVE THEM A SECOND DOSE IF YOU ALREADY HAVE).


3) Drain the excess blood that escaped from the artery.


4) Use a bovie pen to cauterize the blood vessels.


5) Clean the wound inside and out.


6) Suture the artery.

1) You are to check for internal bleeding with a stethoscope. [75+ and there is] SUPPLEMENT WITH LOGICRP WHEN POSSIBLE. (If you stop the bleeding but their blood pressure keeps dropping they probably have at least internal bleeding)

2) Place the patient onto an IV of O- blood (If not done already).

3) Apply powdered quick-clot calcium zeolite.

4) Apply 45ml of Ketamine into their deltoid muscle (DO NOT GIVE THEM A SECOND DOSE IF YOU ALREADY HAVE).

5) Connect the patient to an ECG (ElectroCardioGram) with eight pads onto their torso.

6) Place the patient onto the MAB (Machine Assisted Breather).

7) Make an incision near the area of the punctured lung.

8) (If a rib is puncturing the lung) Remove the rib puncturing the lung and reposition it with screws.

9)a. Check for an exit wound (if the lung was punctured as a result of being shot)[Anything 50+ and there is one]

9)b. (if no exit wound)Remove the bullet with forceps or tweezers.

10) Drain the lungs of blood with a vacuum tube.

11) Cauterize the blood vessels using a bovie pen.

12) Secure the puncture with staples.

13) Suture up the incision.

14) If there is an exit wound, suture the exit wound closed.

14) Prescribe the patient NSAIDs and Daptomycin.

Use a stethoscope to check for internal bleeding. [Anything 80+ and there is]

Check to see if the bone is misaligned [Anything 75+ and it is]

Use an overhead x-ray machine to see if the bone is a compound fracture or just broken. [If you roll +90, and they are heavily wounded or near death, then it is a compound fracture]
Gently pull the limb along its axis steadily increasing the force until the bone realigns.
(DO NOT ATTEMPT TO MANUALLY FORCE THE BONE INTO PLACE)


1) Place a splint on the affected limb to immobilize it.
2) Instruct them not to use said limb and give them supplementary equipment to avoid its use (Crutches, a sling, a cast if necessary, a wheelchair, etc. depending on the severity of the broken limb)
3) Prescribe the patient with NSAIDs.

This is probably going to hurt a fair bit, if your patient seems like they would tense up or be unduly stressed by this, give them a local/general anesthetic before you begin, as you want their muscles as relaxed as is possible.
1) Have someone else hold onto the part of the limb above where the dislocated joint is to immobilize it (Ex: the thigh if they have a dislocated knee)
2) Pull the limb along its axis, steadily increasing the force until the joint pops back into place.
1) Lay the patient down face down with the shoulder or hip off of the bed.
2) Try weighing down the arm/leg, with the patient relaxing as much as possible.
3) If that doesn't work, have someone else hold their waist steady while you:

4) In a slow continuous motion (NEVER A JERKING MOTION) apply pressure from the wrist along the direction of the arm / from the ankle along the direction of the leg.
5) Keep increasing pressure slowly and surely until the joint pops back into place.

1) Apply 45ml of Ketamine into the nearest 4 point muscles (DO NOT GIVE THEM A SECOND DOSE IF YOU ALREADY HAVE).

2) Connect the patient to an ECG to monitor their heart rate and blood pressure.

3) Make an incision and use clamps to hold the wound open.

4) Remove the bone with a medical saw, realign it, and secure it into its proper place with screws.

5) Cauterize the blood vessels.

6) Suture the incision.

7) Apply molding solution and casting wrap.

8) Prescribe the patient NSAIDs and Daptomycin.

Sometimes you are put into a situation where you are forced to use sharp or blunt weapons that can break the skin. For example, Able cuts you with his sword while trying to kill his “challenger”.


1) Check for internal bleeding with a stethoscope. [anything +75 and there is]

2) MAKE SURE TO CLEAN THE WOUNDS THOROUGHLY.

3) Apply 45ml of Ketamine into one of the 4 point muscles.

4) Cover the wound with a gauze pad.

5) Cauterize the blood vessels.

6) Suture it up if it is an extreme laceration.

7) Prescribe the patient with NSAIDs and Daptomycin.

Before you treat the person’s burn, you are to see what type of burn they have.



If your patient is:



Healthy to Hurt: 1st Degree Burn


Wounded: 2nd Degree Burn


Heavily Wounded: 3rd Degree Burn


Near Death: 4th Degree Burn



You are to determine whether or not the 4th Degree Burn is treatable by rolling. If you roll +60, then it is treatable and you can proceed with the next steps. If you don’t then there is nothing you can do, and you are to inform the highest official in their department.



1) Apply a gauze pad coated in petroleum jelly.

2) Remove the skin around the area of the burn.

3) Sterilize it with vaseline.

4) Prescribe the patient Solarcaine and Daptomycin.

If your patient has recently survived a grenade blast, or something of that nomenclature here are the following steps needed to deal with it.

1) Check to see what caused the injury

2) Clean off the wound with the gauze and Isopropyl Alcohol.

3) Check to see if there's any shrapnel sticking out from any part of the body, locate and mark it. (Use LogicRP to determine this)

4) (Only if its a limb wound) Apply tourniquet to the limb where shrapnel is.

5) Deal with any burn wounds before you begin anything else (obviously not covering everything up afterward).

6) Give 10cc of methahexadol in an IV.

7) Wait for patient to fall asleep, then begin the process.

8) Begin to remove the piece of shrapnel.

9) Quickly as possible deal with the shrapnel pieces as any normal bullet wound.

If a poisonous substance has entered the patient’s bloodstream, you are to act fast.

1) Apply Naloxone.

2) Turn the patient’s head sideways to prevent choking when they vomit.

3) Place the patient onto an IV of NaCl saline.

Once you are SURE the patient has a mild concussion:

1) Apply an ice pack to the wound, make sure it is not in direct contact (wrap in a cloth, ect), and change every 20 minutes.

2) Keep the patient awake and focused

1) Give the patient a chemical ice pack (crack it first and shake it, then wrap it in a sterile cloth bag to prevent them from freezing their skin)

2) Give the patient a dose of any NSAID (Ex: Ibuprofen)

Ask the patient if they are experiencing any of the following:

Severe headache

Light sensitivity

Vomiting

Severe nausea

Dizziness/vertigo

Memory loss/ trouble remembering things (ask them what day/month/year it is, where they are, etc.)


If they are experiencing 2+ they may have a concussion and you should proceed with caution.

If they are experiencing 4+ they have a concussion and you should keep them for observation until the symptoms end, while not allowing them to fall asleep.

Check for a broken bone [Anything 80+ and it is]

SUPPLEMENT WITH LOGICRP WHEN POSSIBLE.


Check for a punctured lung if hit in the chest [Anything 85+ and it is]

SUPPLEMENT WITH LOGICRP WHEN POSSIBLE.

Check for internal bleeding [Anything 80+ and it is]

Diseases



Diseases are potentially incredibly dangerous, if you encounter a patient with an unknown disease, put on a hazmat suit and implement standard quarantine procedures for everyone potentially exposed.


Known Diseases

(this should be updated regularly)​

Disease: E-Coli

Symptoms: Red vision and blurred vision.

Treatment: 3 Chloroquine immediately, and 1 every time their vision gets red.

Transmission vector: Consuming infected fecal matter

Prevention method: Always check to make sure your uniform is clean before consuming food.


Disease: Salmonella

Symptoms: None; Death after 5 minutes.

Treatment: 3 Chloroquine immediately.

Transmission vector: Consuming raw/undercooked meat.

Prevention method: Do not consume raw or undercooked meat.
Treating SCPs


There are only specific circumstances when it would be appropriate to perform surgery on scps / medically treat scps, and there are only a few scps that surgery would be appropriate on.


  • 397
  • 662-1
  • 1316 (but get a veterinarian)
  • 2337 (but get a veterinarian)

  • 079 (engineering’s job)

  • 096 (Invincible)

  • 106 (Invincible)

  • 131-A (Anomalous in construction)

  • 131-B (Anomalous in construction)

  • 173 (Invincible)

  • 263 (engineering’s job)

  • 343 (Essentially Invincible)

  • 457 (SID’s Job)

  • 682 (Essentially Invincible)

  • 735 (Invincible)

  • 912 (Invincible)

  • 999 (Essentially Invincible)

  • 1048(Invincible)

  • 1370(Invincible and engineering’s job)

  • 2006(Invincible)

  • 2292(Invincible)

  • 035 (DO NOT TOUCH IT)

  • 049 (DO NOT TOUCH IT)

  • 076-2 (only treat on threat of death, refer to senior medical personnel if possible)

  • 082 (Accelerated healing, but if necessary, refer to senior medical personnel)

  • 939 (Bad idea)

  • 1048-A (Once again, bad Idea)

Medicine ED and OD info

Knowing what, and how much, of something to give is what makes you an effective doctor, use medication sparingly, but effectively.
Medication: Hydroxyethyl

Use: Blood substitute

Effective Dose: Varies

Overdose: 800 ml

Interactions: n/a


Medication: Ketamine

Use: Anesthetic and anesthesia

Effective Dose: 10-59 ml

Overdose: 60 ml

Interactions: n/a


Medication: Hydrocodone

Use: Pain relief //Damage reduction

Effective Dose: 4-6

Overdose: 12

Interactions: n/a


Medication: Klonopin

Use: Anti-anxiety/weak anesthesia

Effective Dose: 7

Overdose: n/a orally

Interactions: n/a


Medication: Chloroquine

Use: Antibiotic antiviral

Effective Dose: Varies

Overdose: 11

Interactions: n/a


Medication: Class A amnestics

Use: Amnestic

Effective Dose: 1 spray

Overdose: Headache at ~3 sprays, knockout at ~5

Interactions: n/a

Treating for shock:
Shock treatment is for any patient that has undergone any form of trauma, whether it be psychological or physical. Just because a patient may not be hurt does not mean they can't be in shock.
  • If the patient has undergone a serious injury on the field, and they are not able to be immediately transported to the medical bay for proper treatment beyond stabilization.
  • If the patient has undergone severe mental trauma. IE: 106 PD encounter, the loss of a colleague's life.
  • Any form of anxiety and/or panic attack.
Symptoms may vary from patient to patient, and some symptoms may be present while others may not.
  • Cool, clammy skin
  • Pale or ashen skin
  • Rapid pulse
  • Rapid breathing
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Enlarged pupils
  • Weakness or fatigue
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Changes in mental status or behavior, such as anxiousness or agitation
The first step to treating shock is getting the patient to lie down and elevate their legs above the heart, and then proceed with proper treatment
An easy way to remember how to treat for shock is this acronym: WARTS
  • W: Warmth- wrap your patient in a blanket, and if necessary remove clothing if bloodstained or wet to maintain body heat.
  • A: ABC(Airway, Breathing, circulation) - Confirm that your patients airway is not closed and they are able to breathe properly and that there are no obstructions. If not, supply them with oxygen and clear out any obstructions in their airway(A). Make sure they are taking slow and deep breaths to control their heart rate and calm their mind(B). Finally, pinch their finger to test their Cap-refill. A slow cap-refill (The blood does not return to their finger within 2 seconds) means that they are still in shock. Repeatedly check ABCs until they are out of shock.
  • R: Rest and reassurance- Provide your patient with proper comfortability. Get them to lie down and constantly reassure them. IE: If they are in shock due to the injury of a colleague, reassure them that the medical personnel will be able to treat them.
  • T: Treatment- Once you reach a stage when they are all checked out, you must find out the underlying cause of their shock. Ask them easy questions such as what happened, and attempt to fix the underlying issue if possible at that moment.
  • S: Semi-prone- Semi prone is simply the position you should have your patient lay in while on the ground. You should have one arm extended above the head, and act as a pillow for the body. The other should lay flat, and you should cross the legs so that they are laying on their side
If a patient is to ever fall unconscious during treatment, life over limb will take play. Make sure to manage their airway to be open by lifting their chin up towards their hand in semi-prone. Confirm that they still have a heart rate, and if not perform CPR until an MRU on the area can use their shock paddles to revive the patient.

Medical Tools:

https://www.concordiagaming.com/index.php?threads/medical-tools.27893/
 
Last edited:

Lore

Uber Tier
Member
// Really good guide. Somethings that could be added or edited:
/mes to stabilize a wound
a punctured lung should be stabilized and the patient brought to an actual hospital
a compound should be stablized and the patient brought to an actual hospital
The 131s are biomechanical, not a robot. Treating them would be difficult because their anatomy is unknown.
1316 is not mechanical at all. It is an anomalous kitten. Engineers have nothing to do with Lucy. Get a vet like 2337 instead.
The effect of each medicine.
 

O'Connor

God Tier
Retired Staff
ULTRA MEGA USER
// Missed some spoiler formatting at the end.
Fixed
/mes to stabilize a wound
not sure what you mean by this
a punctured lung should be stabilized and the patient brought to an actual hospital
In a perfect world, yes, but it's not exactly an option sometimes, hence its inclusion in the medRP guide.
a compound should be stablized and the patient brought to an actual hospital
You can deal with that on area, but they still need to take medical leave, as with any broken bone.
The 131s are biomechanical, not a robot. Treating them would be difficult because their anatomy is unknown.
Fixed
1316 is not mechanical at all. It is an anomalous kitten. Engineers have nothing to do with Lucy. Get a vet like 2337 instead.
Fixed
The effect of each medicine.
Added
 

Lore

Uber Tier
Member
not sure what you mean by this
During a raid, someone is shot and they are below wounded. What /mes would you do to bring them to wounded?

In a perfect world, yes, but it's not exactly an option sometimes, hence its inclusion in the medRP guide.
You can deal with that on area, but they still need to take medical leave, as with any broken bone.
I see what you are saying. Injuries are often non-canon. If it was canon, definitely bring them to the hospital. As for the compound fracture, CI has the equipment to do the stuff so we can deal with it on area as well. It isn't recommended to do though since surgery on a broken bone is very different then removing a bullet. It is a more specialized surgery, especially with different types of bones.
 

SixBytes

Active
Member
// i want to kiss you O'Connor, but the old medical guide was easy to wrap my head around, now, i need to get my heard around this, and also THANK FUCK YOU ADDED THE REQUIRED AMOUNT OF MEDICINE to administer to patients
 

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